BLOGS


  • Here’s What The Georgia Runoff Will Tell Us About The 2018 Midterms By Jeffrey Lazarus, Georgia State University The past month has been fun for me. Not only am I a political scientist who researches Congress and congressional elections, but I also live in Georgia’s 6th House district, which has been the focus of national attention for the past month or so. On April 18, the district held ...
  • The Real Reason I Went To Your College Everyone knows that money plays a major role in students’ college enrollment decisions. How big a role? According to a recent study by Royall & Co., the enrollment management and alumni fundraising arm of EAB, “almost one-fifth of students who were admitted to their top choice of college or university in 2016 but decided not ...
  • And Then… A Scorpion: United Airlines And How (Not) To Handle A Crisis By now most Americans know what happened to Dr. Dao on United Airlines. At this point, a good portion of the planet probably does. But every day the story gets a little worse. Seeing the video of the United passenger being dragged of the plane was bad enough, but United made it worse when the ...
  • ‘Which One Is The Man?’ And 4 Other Things To Stop Saying To Gay Guys A few nights ago, I went to a gay club in Hell’s Kitchen with a few friends. As we walked passed the bar, we caught the attention of a few women. “The guys here are so hot,” I overheard a woman tell her friend. “What a waste,” she added. Hearing those words stung like a ...
  • Trader Joe’s Butter Is As Good As The French Stuff For Bon Appetit, by Christine Muhlke. Not long ago, after a trip to Paris, I set up a butter tasting for a man with a very sophisticated palate. (Because that’s what you do, right?) Alongside the Bordier and the Beillevaire and a slab from Normandy that I’d cadged from the chef at Papillon, I snuck in ...
  • How To Make Mushrooms That Taste Like Bacon Bits For Bon Appetit, by Alyse Whitney. My best friend in college had a thing for frozen vegan bacon. The plasticky scent of it microwaving in our dorm’s communal kitchen and the cardboard texture still gives me nightmares from time to time. I don’t mind tofu or seitan versions of meat, but this fake bacon was more ...
  • California’s Rare ‘Super Bloom’ Flowers Are Migrating North For Architectural Digest, by Nick Mafi. Perhaps nothing announces spring better than a valley of blooming wild flowers. And that is just what residents and visitors of California’s Central Valley have experienced this week. After the Bureau of Land Management posted an Instagram picture of the lush landscape yesterday, the Internet took notice as images began ...
  • 9 Of The Most Spectacular Hotel Residences On The Planet For Architectural Digest, by Carrie Hojnicki. The appeal of a hotel residence is singular — turn-key luxury managed by the most trusted names in hospitality. It’s no wonder then that top hotel brands continue to include homes in their ambitious projects, and that the global jet-set keeps on buying. A particularly exciting addition to the space ...
  • Dubai Will Have Drone Taxis By The Summer For Architectural Digest, by Nick Mafi. Dubai is a city that loves superlatives: world’s tallest skyscraper (Burj Khalifa), world’s largest indoor ski resort (Ski Dubai), or world’s fastest police force (who drive Bugatti Veyrons), to name a few. Now, the largest city in the United Arab Emirates will carry the distinction of yet another record: the ...
  • 9 Gorgeous Fields Of Flowers Worth Traveling To See For Architectural Digest, by Lindsey Mather. Fresh flowers instantly brighten up a home, so imagine being surrounded by millions of them. These nine fields of flowers around the world offer spectacular, mood-lifting views of narcissi, poppies, tulips, bluebonnets, sweet peas, wildflowers, and other stunning varieties, en masse and in every color imaginable. Winter doesn’t seem so ...
  • The World’s Most Dangerous Path Is Reopening To Hikers For Architectural Digest, by Chelsea Stone. On the hunt for a summer vacation that will really get your blood pumping? Look no further than southern Spain’s Caminito del Rey, dubbed “the most dangerous path in the world,” which is set to reopen to daredevils for the summer. This is only the third season that thrill seekers have ...
  • 4 Tips For Coping If You’re Struggling With Depression Having depression is like wearing a dark pair of sunglasses. It starts to color your worldview and suddenly everything can feel very hollow and hopeless. You might find that things which used to bring you joy, now are met with a deep sense of numbness. Your thoughts may begin to get increasingly negative. You might ...
  • Why No More Than A Dribble Of Outside Spending In Kansas? by Andrew Mayersohn Last week, Kansas’ 4th Congressional District nearly produced the first shocking election result of the Trump era. The underfunded and unheralded campaign of Democrat James Thompson came within 8,195 votes of defeating Republican Ron Estes in a district that Trump won by 27 percentage points. The recriminations began almost immediately on ...
  • News Roundup for April 18, 2017 It’s the daily news roundup and it’s another sad day… 1. The United States Supreme Court has denied the request for Arkansas executions to go ahead. These would have been the first state executions in twelve years. What was the rush? Their lethal injection drugs were going to expire. More here. 2. Trump is moving forward with ...
  • Afghan Hope: Tourism, Not Terrorism Concussive bomb thunder and smells of gunpowder aren’t unusual for citizens of Nangarhar, the Afghan province where U.S. forces recently dropped MOAB, the largest non-nuclear explosive ever used. This zone of my native country has been a battleground since the 1980’s Soviet war, which was followed by infestations of Osama bin-Laden’s al-Qaeda, the Taliban, pro-Pakistan mujahideen, ...
  • Solving The Syrian Refugee Crisis Will Require American Leadership The world was shaken as images poured out of the latest chemical attacks on Syria. Heartbreaking photos, like that of Abdel Hameed al-Youseefl, a young husband and father covered in sweat and tears, clutching the bodies of his twin daughters poisoned in the attacks, have awakened the world once again to the nightmare that those living under ...
  • Why The Cleveland Facebook Killer Fascinates Us A year before Steve Stephens posted his grotesque alleged murder of 74-year old Robert Goodwin, Sr. on Facebook, another murderer posted this quip, “Seems the more people you kill, the more you’re in the limelight.” The poster in that case was Chris Harper Mercer, accused of a multiple murder at an Oregon community college in ...
  • What It Is Like To Live In The Intersection Of Trump’s America By Aya Elamroussi I am the intersection of Donald Trump’s rhetoric. I am the Muslim. I am the Immigrant. I am the Woman. I am the Human. Embodying all these identities in the era of 45 is far from easy. I wake up every day hyper-aware of being a Muslim, Egyptian-American immigrant pursuing the American Dream and a chance to contribute ...
  • The Costs Of War — At Home Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Now, we know.  According to Todd Harrison, an expert with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the replacement cost for the 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles recently dumped on an air base in Syria: $89 million. That not-exactly-decisive strike in Washington’s 15 years of war in the ever more chaotic Greater Middle East ...
  • Turkey Just Began A Decade Of Paranoia Under A Modern-Day Sultan ISTANBUL — Alone, anxious and exhausted: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s face shortly after the announcement of the Turkish referendum result was not that of a man celebrating victory but of a man alarmed by near-defeat. Instinctively, one worries for the photographer who took the shot, which tells us all we need to know about the ...