BLOGS


  • The Problem with Immigration A lot of people seem very upset at the border wall President Trump plans to build. Let me just say, that while I understand some of the complaints and I have plenty of reservations about the wall myself. However, I do not see the desire to build the wall as racist. I also do not ...
  • We Have A Right To Question Because He Is A Public Servant And We Are His “Boss” “He’s your president now and you have to get over and deal with it.” Yes, he is my president which means he is a public servant. As a public servant he represents me, therefore I am a constituent who has the right to voice my opinion and concerns if he is not representing me in ...
  • How Trump Just Made America Less Safe Donald Trump’s long-awaited Muslim ban became a reality today. No, you might say, it’s not actually the proposal he outlined during the campaign. True, the ban doesn’t cover every Muslim globally, just a set of Muslims from countries Trump perceives, rather arbitrarily, to be dangerous. But today’s announcement is anchored in his campaign rhetoric, and the ...
  • Understanding the Repercussions of President Trump’s Immigration Executive Orders By Yesha Maniar On the campaign trail, Donald Trump made various comments about immigration, consistently targeting Muslims and Mexicans. He’s claimed numerous times that he wants to create a “Muslim registry” of immigrants and to build a wall along the border between the US and Mexico. In order to incite fear in his potential voters, he ...
  • To tackle the post-truth world, science must reform itself Donald Trump meets with professors and students at the Cleveland Arts and Social Sciences Academy in Cleveland, Ohio. Mike Segar/Reuters Andrea Saltelli, University of Bergen and Silvio Oscar Funtowicz, University of Bergen Before Brexit and the US elections, Nature magazine columnist Colin Macilwain set out a challenge: “If Donald Trump were to trigger a crisis in Western ...
  • Red, White And Blue Coalition The women’s march/rallies this past weekend were truly inspirational, positive and unprecedented. Millions of Americans―women and men―representing racial, economic, age and geographic differences united to send a message to President Donald Trump demanding respect and equality. In its aftermath, the overriding question that lingers is can this momentum continue? In order to ensure that the march was ...
  • Nonviolence And What It Means In The Case Of Richard Spencer I know many of us are celebrating that Richard Spencer – the neo-Nazi – got decked. I loved watching it, too. It’s was movie-caliber cosmic justice and enormously satisfying to my id. That said, while I deeply loathe (and take very seriously) all this man represents, I personally chose not to share the video in celebration ...
  • Becoming a Physician Requires a Peripheral Brain It is very difficult to become a medical doctor. First, you have to go to college and take the necessary prerequisites. These prerequisites include chemistry, physics, organic chemistry, and English. Many medical schools, but not all, require calculus; none of these are “easy A’s”. It is no longer necessary to get an undergraduate degree but ...
  • Drawing your line in the sand How often have you heard that phrase before? Me? I’ve heard it a bunch and ever more so lately from people who are making decisions about where they are taking their business, where they are taking their career, how much to put up with at work, etc. And for a long time, I would hear ...
  • Why Kellyanne Conway’s Alternative Facts Are So Dangerous For Our Kids Oh, Kellyanne, Kellyanne. Where to start? The amount of spin that you have put on things over the past year is staggering, but now, with your newly coined “alternative facts,” I really have to put my foot down. My kids might hear you, and I certainly don’t want them believing that utter nonsense. Now before you ...
  • 1984 In 2006 I had the good fortune to meet Arianna Huffington after a performance of my stage adaptation of George Orwell’s “1984,” which was being produced by the Actors’ Gang Theatre, under the direction of Tim Robbins. She was very enthusiastic about the play, wrote about it on The Post, and asked me if I ...
  • Design Thinking Takes Center Stage The Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU)) meeting next month (February 23-25) in Phoenix announced its upcoming General Education and Assessment Conference. The focus: “Design Thinking for Student Learning.” But what is design thinking and why now is it so important? According to AACU, “General education sits at the intersection of an array of demands facing ...
  • On Jan Fabre, part 4: The Work Finally we conclude a series of thoughts and observations on Jan Fabre’s art, continuing from here, here, and here. He currently has a gigantic exhibition, Knight of Despair/Warrior of Beauty, installed at the State Hermitage Museum, in Saint Petersburg, Russia. I had the pleasure of seeing it there, and have spent a long time since ...
  • Is self-compassion self-indulgent? Interview with Kathleen Cator When you’re struggling to stay motivated, feeling paralyzed by fear or looking straight into the face of failure, how do you push yourself through these moments? Do you let your inner-critic loose and give yourself a stern talking too? Or do you reach out with self-compassion and talk to yourself like a ...
  • Prophecies, Perils, and Promises (Maps of the Conflict, in the Landscape) “Thus said God the Eternal One: When I have gathered the House of Israel from the peoples among which they have been dispersed, and have shown myself holy through them in the sight of the nations, they shall settle on their own soil, which I gave to my servant ...
  • Discovering John Cohen–Again At a wall-to-wall packed opening at the Grey Art Gallery, photographer/ filmmaker / musician John Cohen held court in front of a video installation of some vintage photographs he took at the heyday of artist owned galleries on 10th Street. Talk about a fascinating pocket of art history! “Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York ...
  • 1690 ‘Auer’ Stradivarius Returns to Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto, with Vadim Gluzman and Orpheus Chamber Orchestra By Christopher Johnson, ZEALnyc Contributing Writer, January 27, 2017 Vadim Gluzman, the Ukrainian-born Israeli violinist whose recent gig with the Chicago Symphony won rave reviews, joins the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra for its next concert at Carnegie Hall, on February 4. The program features two headline events: the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto–a first for Orpheus–played on the instrument ...
  • Letter to Ban Ki-Moon from the midst of the gathering darkness I know that many have approached you about the possibility of your serving as president of Korea after the anticipated impeachment of President Park. You have a unique set of skills and a broad range of friends in the international community that would serve you well. Today, you are surrounded by people asking for your ...
  • Florida Keys Journal: Marathon Marathon which lies in the middle of the archipelago is the largest of the Keys and the Seven Mile Bridge between Marathon and Big Pine is the longest. Parallel to it are the remnants of the Florida Keys Over-Sea Railroad conceived by the oil tycoon, Henry Flagler in l912, a feat of engineering and design ...
  • The Korea that can say “No” By Emanuel Pastreich Back in the 1989 the Japanese conservative politician Ishihara Shintaro wrote a best seller entitled “The Japan that can say ‘No’,” in which he argued that Japan was punching beneath its weight. He imagined a self-confident Japan which was capable of refusing unreasonable demands from the United States and maintained a healthy ...